Wednesday, 12 October 2011

Lost in translation

I love the way that we can be chatting away with each other, apparently talking the same language, only to suddenly come across something that does not transmit properly.

My all time favourite was seeing Carrie Fisher on a British talk show talking about weight loss, holding her arms out and declaring that "my fanny used to be THIS BIG!", causing the presenter and audience to almost die laughing.  That word means something totally different over here...

Anyway, my last post gave some of you the impression that I drink these in the morning:


This would be quite a feat, and even if made into some sort of smoothy I doubt it would taste very good even if it would probably be very good for you.

The squash that I drink is much more normal:


Fruit flavoured stuff that you mix with water.

Have a great Wednesday!

12 comments:

wigsf3 said...

Okay, I'll bite. What does fanny mean in British slang?

Rock Chef said...

Wigsf - you just want me to type v@$%*a on my blog!

TechnoBabe said...

Is the first ingredient sugar in the squash drink?

Oh I get it. The V word. How could fanny at the back in the US be V in the front in the UK?

Rock Chef said...

TechnoBabe - Probably, but at least I tend to drink "no added sugar" versions. Ah, the fun of language development!

wigsf3 said...

There are plenty of other words you can write instead of the V word. Shall I list them for you?

Rock Chef said...

Wigsf - yes - on your own blog, if you don't mind!

Shrinky said...

I had the same translation problem on one of my posts, when I advised never to point to your fanny and wink at a Greek pharmasist..

I never realised how phalic butternut squashes look, up until seeing that photo here.

Rock Chef said...

Shrinky - Hah, that is funny! Hm, is this the old you or the Prime Minister speaking? :-)

Shrinky said...

S'alright, you're not on my list for The Tower.. yet (wink)!

Ninny said...

I wondered about the squash, too. I have a hard time looking at food before ten in the morning and the thought of a squash for breakfast had me pretty gaggy. Now I'm wondering about the fanny. I envision a rear end (not to be confused with the back bumper of a car) and Shrinky's remark about the Greek pharmacist went totally over my head (not to be confused anything phalic) so I think I'll just stop now.

terri said...

I suspected it was some sort of juice. I just love to point out the language differences we have, even though we both speak "English." I do love butternut squash, but I would not want to drink it.

I never knew that fanny meant THAT! Too funny!

agg79 said...

Thanks for clearing that up. I was wondering how you got that squash in a glass.

I love how things don't quite translate the same in other countries. I'll have to be careful next time I am conversing with my cowokers in Belgium.